Beer Review – Fuller’s ESB


Fuller's ESB

Recently, I assembled a mixed six with a decidedly English bent. One of the bottles was the Fuller’s ESB. . Now, we had a lengthy discussion regarding aging when I came across a 2010 Fuller’s Vintage Ale and with the help of Miracle Max, we put that theory to the test with 2009 through 2011 bottles. Additionally, awhile back I had the London Porter, the London Pride and the Gale’s Prize Old Ale. So, the folks at Fuller Smith & Turner are not an unknown. The Fuller’s ESB is an Extra Special/Strong Bitter and is rated as one of the finest examples of the style by Beer Advocate. While known for the London Pride, Fuller’s is the only brewer to have had three of their beers (London Pride, ESB and Chiswick Bitter) named Champion Beer of Britain.

Here is what Fuller’s has to say about its ESB: Continue reading

Beer Review – DAB Original


During a recent trip to Wegman’s, I assembled a mixed six with a predominantly English and German slant. I can remember my Pappy telling a story about a beer truck overturning and the driver passing cases of DAB beer to the firemen in gratitude for their rapid response. So, with a nostalgic thought in mind, I picked up the bottle of the Original from Dortmunder Actien Brauerei or DAB. DAB is a brewery that was founded in 1868 in Dortmund, Germany. By 1879, DAB was exporting to four continents and by the turn of the century, winning medals all over the world. Today, DAB is still one of Germany’s major export brands and exports to 20 countries worldwide.

Here is what DAB has to say about its Original: Continue reading

Beer Review – Fuller’s London Pride


During a recent trip to Wegman’s, I assembled a mixed six with a predominantly English and German slant. The first bottle I pulled out of the six was the Fuller’s London Pride. Now, we had a lengthy discussion regarding aging when I came across a 2010 Fuller’s Vintage Ale and with the help of Miracle Max, we put that theory to the test with 2009 through 2011 bottles. Additionally, awhile back I had the London Porter and the Gale’s Prize Old Ale. So, the folks at Fuller Smith & Turner are not an unknown. The London Pride is an English Pale Ale and the UK’s leading premium cask ale. Fuller’s is known for the London Pride as well as a number of other award-winning ales such as Chiswick Bitter, ESB and 1845. Fuller’s is the only brewer to have had three of their beers (London Pride, ESB and Chiswick Bitter) named Champion Beer of Britain.

Here is what Fuller’s has to say about its London Pride: Continue reading

Beer Review – Harviestoun Bitter & Twisted


photo courtesy of onebeeratatime.wordpress.com

During the summer, I had the good fortune to try the Harviestoun Old Engine Oil, so when I saw the Bitter & Twisted at Roger Wilco, I jumped at the chance to try another Harviestoun product. Here is what Harviestoun has to say about their Bitter & Twisted:

It is a delightfully refreshing blond beer with a finish that is like a twist of lemon. Bitter & Twisted has a very fresh hoppy profile and the judicious use of aromatic Hersbrucker and the spicy Challenger. The distinctive finish comes from late hopping with Stryian Continue reading

Beer Review – Harviestoun Old Engine Oil


Photo courtesy of http://www.tastingbeers.com

I had stopped in to Kress Liquors to check out their assortment of canned beer for an upcoming pool party. Always a sucker for proper merchandising, I wandered over to the import wall and immediately was struck by the Old Engine Oil. I put together a couple of chocolate stouts (incl. Rogue Chocolate and  Young’s Double Chocolate) and added a bottle in for tasting. From the Harviestoun site:

Old Engine Oil is strong and dark but wickedly smooth. Chocolate dominates the palate but is nicely balanced with a hoppy bitterness. Old Engine Oil is a delicious post-prandial beer with a bittersweet aftertaste.

Harviestoun’s founder Ken Brooker spent much of his life crafting wooden design prototypes for Ford. The viscous nature of this Continue reading

Beer Review – Samuel Smith’s Organically Produced Ale


While suffering through a Phillies playoff game, I felt the need for a new beverage. Always a big fan, I opted for yet another product from Samuel Smith and thought I would give the Organically Produced Ale a try. I found the pour to yield an orange haze with a nice bit of foam. The overall aroma was malty with a slight fruity scent. The taste was clearly malt with almost no hint of hops. The mouth feel was thick and full and the finish was a litter bitter. Overall, this is a good beer. While the Beer Advocate gave it a B+, as I am partial to Samuel Smith products, I would rate it a little higher and give it an A-.